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The WCC and eco-justice

The WCC work on eco-justice addresses the intrinsic connection between the ecological crises and socio-economic injustice.
The WCC and eco-justice

Stones uncovered by melting glaciers in Greenland and dried corn from Africa were brought to an ecumenical celebration during UN climate talks in Copenhagen.

The WCC has a long tradition of addressing the links between Justice, Peace and Integrity of Creation. Today, this approach is applied and updated in regard to some of the most urgent global challenges.

The WCC work on eco-justice is implemented through the Ecumenical Water Network, the Climate Justice project and the Poverty, Wealth and Ecology project.

Eco-justice – what is that?

The “eco” prefix comes from the Greek word oikos for “house” and is part of the etymological roots of economy and ecology, but also ecumenism. In linking environmental and social justice issues the environmental justice approach, “eco-justice” in short, challenges both humanity’s destruction of the earth and the abuse of economic and political power which result in poor people having to suffer the effects of environmental damage.

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